Makey Makey Madness

Join the (3)

Since I started at JoyLabz creating content, I’ve been super busy! I wanted to post some of the resources I’ve made.

Gigantic Makey Makey

One of my most favorite things I’ve made in the last month is this gigantic playable Makey Makey.  I can’t believe I never thought to make one before! I saw an example by Jen Gilbert at ISTE and another on the Makey Makey Educators Facebook group by Jason Quail of Amazeum. I just knew this had to be my first tutorial now that I’m part of the Joy Labz team. Find the Instructables here.

Controlling a Mouse Click in Scratch

This was a quick and short tutorial in controlling a mouse click in Scratch! The full guide is here.

Simple Circuits Challenge – Updated

I’ve learned a lot about electronics and circuits since I wrote the lessons for Makey Makey in 2015. So I’ve decided to update each lesson. It was really fun to update this simple circuit lesson and think about how I can push students and teachers to get inventive with materials.

Kid Friendly Alligator Clips

I’ve been sitting on this idea for awhile! It was fun to share this simple hack about how to make a kid-friendly alligator clip with a clothespin.

All ya need is a clothespin and some conductive tape!

Hack #1: Here is the full video of how to make one.

Hack #2: This hack uses a clothespin to make a conductivity tester. You actually wire EARTH and a key press on one clothespin for this one. The full lesson idea is in Labz and includes a Scratch game and both clothespin hacks.

Micro:bit and Makey Makey

I always think mashing up resources makes more sense than choosing one over the other. So I decided to challenge myself to use Micro:bit and Makey Makey together. Thanks to Scratch 3, I was able to control the Micro:bit with Makey Makey and bananas !

Getting started with Physical Computing

Last but most definitely not least! I was able to spend an hour with my good buddy Mark Schreiber talking about physical computing. I ended up writing one massive blog post of resources. You can find that here.

What’s next?

I’ve been working on a lot! But will always take suggestions and make your suggestions if it makes sense! What Makey Makey resources are you wishing for?

Advertisements

Big News! New gig as Content Creator at Makey Makey

16 years ago I graduated with a BFA in photography, and I loved getting a degree in art. (Read my apology to my art degree here.) Every semester I learned new skills and found new passions. (Like lithography, I almost decided to get an MFA in printmaking after taking that course!) However, I soon realized that I couldn’t really work full time as an artist, so I applied for grad school and got my Masters in Education.

I wanted to work in schools because of the negative experiences I had with teachers as a student. I’m happy to say I was able to spend 15 years in schools trying to let kids know that they came first and that every student has the potential to be creative. (This was my focus an English teacher and as a librarian.)

After my art degree, I was still consumed with learning new skills, and creating things. In the early 2000s I taught myself to sew and created an Etsy shop. As a beginning teacher, I taught myself to knit and even hosted a weekly knitting meet up for a few years.

So it makes sense that I became a maker educator. Making things and learning how things work is part of what makes me tick.

Plu, after writing maker project books with Aaron, and sharing new projects with Twitter and Instagram friends, I realized that my work in schools could continue, even if I am not in a school on a daily basis.

makey

So it makes me extremely happy to tell you readers that I’m forging a new career path at Makey Makey/Joy Labz. My new job as Director of Community and Creative Content is to make stuff and share it. My daily tasks are to share ideas with the maker community, and create content to help you and your makers grow. Don’t worry, I’ll still be in area schools testing projects and teaching students how to find their inner creativity.

It will just be on a much larger scale.

Speaking of larger scale, here is my first project as a content creator. I hope you have fun making and hacking this oversized Makey Makey! This oversized tool is a great way to teach students how to use a Makey Makey.

This blog will continue to focus on maker projects (Makey Makey and beyond!) and I’ll still be reviewing maker tools for use in schools (Upcoming reviews include: Scratch Coding Cards, Scratch Jr Coding Cards, and various sewing machines for all school levels.) Aaron evens says he’ll be coming on as a contributor and writing about projects he attempts with his students.